Cirque du Soleil’s “O”

Cirque du Soleil’s “O”


We had occasion recently to see Cirque du Soleil in Las Vegas. They have several shows at different venues; we went to “O” at the Bellagio. I had expected to see acrobats and dancers, not realizing that this show is water-based. Not only were the performers excellent acrobats and dancers, contortionists and mimes, gymnasts and actors,  they were world class divers, swimmers, and water-dancers as well. What a show!


No doubt there was a greater feeling of mystery for those seated below us; we were in the balcony, but in the front so there was nothing but a large amount of air between us and the performance. When an acrobat descended from the ceiling on a chandelier at the beginning of the show, she was right in front of us. Wow!

The minor disadvantage of being high enough for spotlights to sometimes shine in our eyes was balanced by the ability to look down into the pool and see scuba divers directing traffic and supplying oxygen beneath the surface.


Which brings me to another topic–engineering. This is a remarkable stage which one minute is deep enough to accommodate very high divers and the next is a solid surface for dancers and gymnasts to glide, twirl, or roll across. It is one thing to have a mobile stage which goes up and down, with portions that move this way and that, but quite another to move thousands of gallons of water at the same time. Bravo to the engineers, builders, and stage managers.


Ticket prices were expensive for a little farm boy like me, though very much in line with other Vegas shows. Our balcony tickets were over $100 apiece. Nevertheless, it was well worth it to see this incredible show, a once in a lifetime experience. “O” is supposed to have a plot, by the way, all about the cycle of life and human history or something like that. Feel free to try to figure it out–the souvenir program may help. The story is very continental European, that is to say, French, hence subtle. It doesn’t really matter. The show is fantastic whatever the plot may be.


How is that even possible? Really?



Spanaway Fantasy Lights



Among the many events and activities in the south Puget Sound area which are conducive to building the Christmas spirit is a wonderful drive-through light display at Spanaway Park. Now in its 24th year, this beautiful exhibit includes over 300 displays and thousands of lights.

We have lived in this area many years and had heard of a light display, but only last night actually went to the park to see it; it was delightful, well worth the $14 per car entrance fee (we accidentally arrived on the last night of half price admission).

For more information, call 253-798-3330 or visit Hours are 5:30 pm to 9:00 pm and will continue through January 1st.



fantasy lights


Utah Shakespeare

The summer season of the wonderful Utah Shakespeare Festival in Cedar City is well underway, but there is plenty of time to add it to your vacation itinerary. This year’s selection includes Romeo and Juliet, As You Like It, and A Midsummer Night’s Dream, all perennial favorites. You may also enjoy Shakespeare in Love, an adaptation of the movie and a regional premier. Other regional premiers are Treasure Island and William Shakespeare’s Long Lost First Play (Abridged).

On the musical side of the house is the great Guys and Dolls, subtitled A Musical Fable of Broadway. Finally, there are two world premieres, The Tavern, a comedy by George M. Cohan adapted and directed by Joseph Hanreddy, and How to Fight Loneliness by Neil LaBute, characterized as “for mature audiences”. Two of our favorites return as directors, Brian Vaughn with Shakespeare in Love and David Ivers with How to Fight Loneliness.


The Utah festival produces consistently excellent theater. You cannot go wrong in this beautiful mountain setting, about a 50 minute drive from St. George or three and half hours from Salt Lake City. The summer season goes through September 9th, with a shorter fall season running from September 13th through October 21st.

For schedule details and to reserve tickets, go to:


Also an enticing peek at next year:

2018 will see performances of The Merry Wives of Windsor and Othello, as well as Big River, a musical adaptation of Huckleberry Finn with music by Roger Miller, bound to be a delight.


Best Wishes.

The Society




A number of years ago my wife and I had the good fortune to meet Kirby Heyborne and arrange for him to perform in the Auburn Fine Arts Center in Auburn, Washington. At a memorable moment mid-way through the performance he paused on stage to call home and say goodnight to his children. The audience loved it.

At the time Kirby was making a name for himself as a singer and comedian; he was already well known for his work in several successful movies, The Best Two Years, The RM, The Three Stooges, and others.

He more recently has been busy with his Los Angeles based improv group, The Society. Kirby’s pleasant demeanor, clean humor, and positive spirit contribute to consistently good entertainment. Others who work with him in The Society include his long-time friend Lincoln Hoppe, Corbin Allred, Kelly Lohman, and several more–all talented performers.

Corbin performed with Kirby in one of the concerts we produced in Auburn. We became friends and have stayed in touch as he has progressed through life (he has many, balanced interests). Also a singer and actor, he has appeared in various T.V. shows and movies, including Robin Hood: Men in Tights, Saints and Soldiers, and The Saratov Approach.

We hope to arrange for The Society to come to the Northwest in the near future. In the meantime, take a look at some of their work at the following links. It will be worth your time. Be sure to take a look at Kerblink, a joint effort with Lincoln Hoppe which is downright hilarious.