The Society

 

the_society_logo-names

 

A number of years ago my wife and I had the good fortune to meet Kirby Heyborne and arrange for him to perform in the Auburn Fine Arts Center in Auburn, Washington. At a memorable moment mid-way through the performance he paused on stage to call home and say goodnight to his children. The audience loved it.

At the time Kirby was making a name for himself as a singer and comedian; he was already well known for his work in several successful movies, The Best Two Years, The RM, The Three Stooges, and others.

He more recently has been busy with his Los Angeles based improv group, The Society. Kirby’s pleasant demeanor, clean humor, and positive spirit contribute to consistently good entertainment. Others who work with him in The Society include his long-time friend Lincoln Hoppe, Corbin Allred, Kelly Lohman, and several more–all talented performers.

Corbin performed with Kirby in one of the concerts we produced in Auburn. We became friends and have stayed in touch as he has progressed through life (he has many, balanced interests). Also a singer and actor, he has appeared in various T.V. shows and movies, including Robin Hood: Men in Tights, Saints and Soldiers, and The Saratov Approach.

We hope to arrange for The Society to come to the Northwest in the near future. In the meantime, take a look at some of their work at the following links. It will be worth your time. Be sure to take a look at Kerblink, a joint effort with Lincoln Hoppe which is downright hilarious.

http://www.kirbyheyborne.com/kirby_heyborne_improv.php

http://kerblink.com/

http://www.jointhesociety.com/

http://kirbyheyborne.blogspot.com/

http://www.lincolnhoppe.com/

Advertisements

Town and Country

Though born in a sizable city, Portland, Oregon, I am grateful to have been raised in the country. Even when we moved back to Portland while I was in Junior High School, it was not Portland per se, but a rural suburb. The sense of connection to the land and love for it that I grew up with have only been reinforced by the intervening years and travels. It is at least partly a sense of reverence and appreciation for God’s creations, but it is also an appreciation for the character that country life fosters. Like most things, this turns out to have political implications as well.

Victor Davis Hanson explored this concept in an essay linked below. It is well worth reading, not just for the political explanation, but also for the historical references:

http://www.city-journal.org:8080/html/trump-and-american-divide-14944.html

Merry Christmas, After All

The Leftists continue to rant and rave about the election, Clinton continues to blame everyone except herself, and the climate crackpots continue to carry on despite record-breaking cold. (Oh! That’s right, any old weather “event” will do since they changed it from “global warming” to “climate change”.) In other words, things are continuing today pretty much as they were yesterday. But there is one big event in the offing, namely, The Trump Presidency, which we hope will fundamentally reverse all that fundamental transformation that the last eight years inflicted upon us. Hope and change indeed! Those had to wait for the American people to find an unlikely champion in a New York billionaire.

More important than any of that is the event we celebrate next Sunday, the birth of our Lord and Savior, Jesus Christ, the Promised Messiah. May we all take time to remember Him and re-commit to follow His teachings and imitate His example. May we enjoy the company and fellowship of family and friends, enjoy the trappings of the season, enjoy the good food, and thank merciful heaven for our abundant blessings.

Here is a wonderful video depiction of The Nativity:

https://www.lds.org/bible-videos/videos/the-nativity?lang=eng

 

Best Wishes and Merry Christmas!

 

A New World Order

Niall Ferguson has published a brilliant and insightful essay on foreign policy in which the prospects for international order in our day are compared to those of Roosevelt. No, not that one, Teddy. Though long, it is well worth reading.

Donald Trump’s New World Order

 

Understanding Propaganda

The disgusting bias of the major news media in the recent election may give us pause to consider the difference between journalism and propaganda.

Those of a certain age will recall classes in school–yes, public schools–about how Nazis and Communists and other -ists manipulate their messages to mislead the masses. That was during the height of the cold war and was important so the American people could more easily discern truth from error. More recent generations have not been given such information, just as they have long since stopped hiding under desks during air-raid warnings.

In the end, all such tools, just as the -isms which use them, are means to a common end: the exercise of power by one group over another. This was one of the themes of my book, All Enlisted, and is perhaps the dominant theme of all history.

An excellent review of how journalism becomes corrupted follows:

http://thefederalist.com/2016/11/21/journalism-turns-propaganda/

 

Almost Election Eve

This election has become a bitter and desperate battle for survival of the most utterly corrupt figure ever to occupy the national stage and the so-called “elite” politicians, bureaucrats, lobbyists, media, and academics who support her. That includes a sizeable number of Republicans who care more about their perks and privileges than their duty and honor. You may not have wanted Trump as the leader of the charge against this cabal, but there he is, doing well and speaking right. We will hope for the best. Following is a quote from my book, The Federalist, Excerpts With Commentary, 2nd edition, first Madison, then my commentary:

 

LXXI. THE DURATION IN OFFICE OF THE EXECUTIVE

The tendency of the legislative authority to absorb every other, has been fully displayed and illustrated . . . The representatives of the people, in a popular assembly, seem sometimes to fancy that they are the people themselves, and betray strong symptoms of impatience and disgust at the least sign of opposition from any other quarter; as if the exercise of its rights, by either the executive or judiciary, were a breach of their privilege and an outrage to their dignity. They often appear disposed to exert an imperious control over the other departments . . .

(T)he best security for the fidelity of mankind is to make their interest coincide with their duty.

 

  1. Arrogance, the Imperial Congress, and the Imperial President

Congress has been particularly aggressive in expanding its power relative to the presidency following periods of presidential embarrassment such as after Watergate, during much of the Carter administration, and during the latter portions of the Reagan and first Bush administrations. This took on a partisan character because of long-lasting, one-party rule in the legislature. How then to explain the lack of congressional assertion of power during the remarkably expansive and repeatedly illegal actions of the Obama years? When controlled by the same party, they presumably agreed with him, but when controlled by the opposing party, why are there no concrete actions, special prosecutors, indictments, etc.? Does an unprecedentedly arrogant, Imperial President intimidate them? Or has Congress become so corrupt they simply want to stay at the trough and not “rock the boat”? Do their personal interests coincide with their duty?

 

Russian Grand Ballet’s The Sleeping Beauty

russianclassicalgrandballet_sleepingbeauty

When the words Russian and ballet are used in the same sentence, we expect something grand; the Russian Grand Ballet company’s recent performance of Tchaikovsky’s The Sleeping Beauty did not disappoint. Sets were beautiful, costumes stunning, and the dancing uniformly excellent. The Lilac Fairy, performed by Yulia Zakharenko, was especially exquisite. Very tall, taller than the princes, with elegant long arms and legs, she clearly was a prima ballerina and we thought we had seen the star. Only later when Olga Kifyak appeared as Princess Aurora, flawlessly performing the wonderful Rose Adagio, did we realize this company has at least two prima ballerinas, not to mention several others nearly as outstanding.

Most male dancers are there to accent the ballerinas, turn them gracefully, and most especially make sure they are not hurt (“Don’t drop the girl”!), but when Yevgeniy Svetlitsa came flying on stage as Prince Desire, it was clear he is a master of his art and a joy to behold. Now, to have one great male dancer is wonderful, but we were delighted again in a later pas de deux to see Constantine Mayorov performing similar excellent leaps and turns with precision and power.

Great ballet is a display of skill, strength, grace, and artistic sense that requires years of training and on-going practice. To see this familiar tale portrayed in dance to such wonderful music was a delight; all in all, an excellent night out. Our only complaint, our good old Pantages Theater in Tacoma, a classic building filled with faded elegance, needs new chairs. A short performance is fine, but full length performances are physically taxing; perhaps there is a rich patron in the audience somewhere who could do something about it.

If you wish to see beautiful dance at the highest level, consider The Russian Grand Ballet next time they come to America. Alas, you have missed them for this year. They are headed home after a tour that lasted from Sept 20th through Oct 29th–36 performances all over the country, with only 4 days off, a grueling schedule. But then again, they are dancers. I have had the pleasure of associating at least somewhat with dancers and musicians, artists and actors, my entire adult life. Dancers in particular often display an interesting pattern–they may practice all day and perform all evening, then for relaxation have a nice meal and do what? Go dancing!